Terms and Policies

Copyright & reproduction

Please note that all words and photographs on this site are © Martine van Bijlert (unless stated otherwise). You can reference or quote my work, but you cannot use it for commercial purposes.

An email letting me know that you’ve referenced my work is always appreciated.

Writing

If you quote or reproduce my words on your blog or in an article please credit me, Martine van Bijlert, by name with a hyperlink back to the original post. Do not reproduce whole blog posts or pages without permission.

Photography

Please do not to use, repost or reproduce any of the pictures on this site without contacting me first.

When we have agreed to the usage of the picture, you will credit the photograph by name and with a hyperlink back to this site: www.martinevanbijlert.com

The photographs cannot be changed or edited in any way, unless otherwise agreed. No cropping, no processing.

About your personal information

Any personal information you provide will be protected and handled responsibly, according to the current laws and general principles of decency and respect.

The collection and storage of your information is only done with your consent and to fulfil its purpose – in this case: name and email address for the purpose of receiving newsletters. I will not share your personal information with third parties.

This privacy policy was last updated on 9 April 2019.

If you have any questions, you can contact me here.

Bio of Martine van Bijlert

Bio Martine van Bijlert (200 words)

Martine van Bijlert is a writer, photographer and leading analyst on Afghanistan. She has closely followed the region since the early 1990s, has published widely, travelled extensively and is fluent in Dari.

Martine grew up in pre-revolutionary Iran and returned to the Netherlands just before the 1979 Iranian revolution. Her interest in the region was rekindled when she visited Quetta, Pakistan, as a student in the early 1990s to study the situation of Afghan refugees. She worked as an aid worker in Grozny and in Kabul under the Taliban; as an asylum officer for the Immigration and Nationalisation Service in the Netherlands; and as political secretary for the Netherlands Embassy in Tehran.

In 2004 she began her work as an independent analyst of Afghanistan, first as political adviser to the EU Special Representative for Afghanistan in Kabul, then as an adviser on Uruzgan to the Netherlands Embassy in Kabul. In 2009 she co-founded the Afghanistan Analysts Network and served as AAN’s co-director and senior analyst until September 2017. A list of publications on Afghanistan can be found here and here.

Martine has just finished her first novel, a story situated in Kabul, and is working on her second.

Short bio Martine van Bijlert (75 words)

Martine van Bijlert is a writer, photographer and leading analyst on Afghanistan. She worked as an aid worker, diplomat, consultant and independent researcher and is co-founder of the Kabul-based think tank the Afghanistan Analysts Network. She has published widely, travelled extensively and is fluent in Dari.

Martine has just finished her first novel, a story situated in Kabul, and is working on her second.

For her publications on Afghanistan see here or here.

Flash bio Martine van Bijlert (40 words)

Martine van Bijlert is a writer, photographer and researcher with a strong focus on Afghanistan and its region. She is co-founder of the Afghanistan Analysts Network, has published extensively and has just finished her first novel, a story situated in Kabul.

Select publications on Afghanistan by Martine van Bijlert include:

A complete list of her publications for AAN can be found here and here.

“Afghanistan’s Post-Liberal Peace: between external intervention and local efforts”, in: Oliver P. Richmond and Sandra Pogodda (eds.) Post-Liberal Peace Transitions Between Peace Formation and State Formation, Edinburgh University Press, January 2016.

“The Taliban in Zabul and Uruzgan”, in: Peter Bergen and Katherine Tiedemann (eds.) Talibanistan: Negotiating the Borders Between Terror Politics and Religion, Oxford University Press, January 2013.

“Social Protection in Afghanistan: Between Conflict, Transition and International Aid”, in: Sara Ashencaen Crabtree, Jonathan Parker and Azlina Azman (eds.), The Cup, the Gun and Crescent; Social Welfare and Civil Unrest in Muslim Societies, Whiting & Birch, November 2012.

Snapshots of an Intervention. The Unlearned Lessons of Afghanistan’s Decade of Assistance (2001-11), edited volume with Sari Kouvo, Afghanistan Analysts Network, July 2012.

Untangling Afghanistan’s 2010 Vote: Analysing the Electoral Data, Afghanistan Analysts Network, February 2011.

The Battle for Afghanistan: Zabul and Uruzgan, New America Foundation, October 2010.

Who Controls the Vote? Afghanistan’s Evolving Elections. Afghanistan Analysts Network, September 2010.

How to Win an Afghan Election. Perceptions and Practices, Afghanistan Analysts Network, August 2009.

“Unruly Commanders and Violent Power Struggles: Taliban Networks in Uruzgan”, in: Antonio Giustozzi (ed.) Decoding the New Taliban. Insights from the Afghan Field, Colombia: Hurst, 2009

“Imaginary Institutions: State Building in Afghanistan”, in Doing Good or Doing Better? Development Policies in a Globalising World, WRR/Dutch Scientific Council for Government Policy, June 2009.

Between Discipline and Discretion. Policies Surrounding Subnational Appointments, Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU), May 2009.